Azure Development Virtual Machines


So I tried the new virtual machines on Azure for Visual Studio.  I’ve always dreamed of using a vm to do my development on, but never really trusted it because Visual Studio (VS) is such a performance hog.  Well, here are my results.  I downloaded “ImageResizer” from Codeplex, a popular C# program, and then built it on my local machine and the Visual Studio VM.  My local machine runs 64-bit Win 8.1 Pro with a Intel i5 4670K CPU @ 3.4 GHz and 8 GB of RAM.  It is also on VS Ultimate 2012.  The Azure VM has a AMD Opteron Processor 4171 HE at 2.10 GHz and 3.5 GB of RAM on 64-bit Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter.  It is running VS Pro 14 CTP (the latest and greatest).

Now, the results.

My local machine built it in ~1.1 seconds.  

The VM built it in ~3.1 seconds.

A factor of 3.  Not great, but not that bad either.  I could see myself doing it, maybe….  lots of advantages (clean machine, always running the latest and greatest, etc.).  But it still feels like it’s on the cusp of prime time.

Best Practices when customizing Work Items in Team Foundation Server (TFS)


So I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how to customize work items while still making sure the TFS instance is able to upgrade smoothly to future versions. In my Internet research, I actually came upon a good article on this from of all sources, Rational (Microsoft’s main competitor). This is due to the fact that they use almost the exact same data model for work items in their product (Rational Team Concert) as TFS does. They both even call them work items! Anyways, the article does a good job of dividing customization’s into “Safe”, “Cautious”,and “Harmful”. Based on my experience and expertise, these are some good principles to follow when customizing work items in a process template. You don’t want to over customize and be stuck on TFS 2005 for the next 10 years!
Enjoy!

https://jazz.net/library/article/1002

A Review of TeamSpec – a TFS plug-in for MS Word


Two years ago I did an evaluation of TeamSpec and pointed out some areas of improvement. I’m very happy to report that the company took these to heart and updated their product to address these. Here is my updated review based on TeamSpec v.4.2.1.

TeamSpec is a 3rd-party add-in for MS Word that connects it to Team Foundation Server.  It works with the newest version of TFS 2012 and Office (2013).  It is the only commercial add-in for Word currently on the TFS platform. There are other companies that have add-in’s as part of their overall suite or solution, but TeamSpec is the only product to concentrate on just Word and it does it quite well.

How It Works

Work item attributes are linked to sentences or words in your Word Document.  This is a bi-directional sync between TFS and Word.  For example, say you have  a requirement work item with the ID of 3 and the title is “Login to system”.  You could create a line in Word with the tool like so:

REQ ID 3 – Login to System, State: Proposed

When you changed the state of the requirement work item from “Proposed” to “Active” in TFS, the line would change in Word to:

REQ ID 3 – Login to System, State: Active

This could also be done the other way by changing the state in Word and publishing the change to TFS.

Additionally, you can create “Skins” which are basically pre-defined layouts for work items. You could say that you want the state of work items to always be in bold and italicized in a skin for example.

Added Functionality

The new functionality that I really like and makes it a valuable product is the ability to use work item queries from TFS with Word. Writing custom reports in Reporting Services for Word is not easy, especially since the HTML fields are not stored in the TFS Data Warehouse. This product makes it a cinch! No more writing a huge SRS! Just generate it! :)

Linked worked items are supported in queries and test cases are supported as well!!! So you can do your testing documents here as well.

The documentation has improved tremendously, but a few more “behind-the-scenes” articles in the documentation would be nice. I also hold some small reservations about the long term stability of the company as it appears to be small, so be sure to ask for the source code when you buy the product. But to be fair, they have been in business since 2005.

Conclusion

I highly recommend you look at this product if you are using TFS as your ALM platform. Microsoft majorly overlooked Word integration in TFS (although they got Excel and Project), but alas, this is where partners like TeamSolutions step in! Thank you TeamSolutions for stepping in so well!

Use the TFS Process Template used by Microsoft


Found this interesting post that explains the “ISD” process template that is used by Microsoft Consulting Services. I always get asked by customers what Microsoft uses for TFS, well now here’s a process template used by a branch of MS. Enjoy!

An Example Coding Style Guide for .Net


This is a great example of code style guide used by Microsoft for internal coding. I’ve included a sample of it below. Enjoy!!!

All-In-One Code Framework Coding Standards

TFS on Azure is publicly available!


Brian Harry announced it today on his blog.  I’ve tried it out and it’s awesome!  They’ve got much of what you would find on a local tfs install, but of course it’s using the new tfs 2012 stuff and the web access is much better.  They’ve got the Scrum 2.0, CMMI 6.0, and Agile 6.0 templates to choose from, but they all have a “Scrum-ish” feeling to them.  For instance the CMMI one has a backlog!  Interesting development….

Go check it out today and use it while it’s still free!

New Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) Group in Washington, DC Area!


Are you interested in Software Engineering?  How to use ALM tools to make your software development organization?  Then come join us on Thursday, June 21 for the inaugrual meeting of the DC ALM Group!  Hope to see you there!

Kick-Off and Continuous Deployment with Team Foundation Server

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